Tag Archives: reading

East versus West

Contemplating right now:

“From the start Greeks and Latins had each approached the Christian Mystery in their own way. At the risk of some oversimplification, it can be said that the Latin approach was more practical, the Greek more speculative; Latin thought was influenced by juridical ideas, by the concepts of Roman law, while the Greeks understood theology in the context of worship and in the light of the Holy Liturgy. When thinking about the Trinity, Latins started with the unity of the Godhead, Greeks with the threeness of the persons; when reflecting on the Crucifixion, Latins thought primarily of Christ the Victim, Greeks of Christ the Victor; Latins talked more of redemption, Greeks of deification; and so on.”

-Timothy Ware

BlogBooster-The most productive way for mobile blogging. BlogBooster is a multi-service blog editor for iPhone, Android, WebOs and your desktop

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Daily, 11/13

Bean and Papa reading a book together. Love.

BlogBooster-The most productive way for mobile blogging. BlogBooster is a multi-service blog editor for iPhone, Android, WebOs and your desktop

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The October Daily, 10/19

I love my little bookworm!

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Month fifteen

Bean is fifteen months old on this lovely Christmas Eve. So here are pictures from the past month and and update on what is going on lately in her little world.


We finally had some rain earlier this month and Bean was completely facinated. She pretty much stayed glued to the window all day long to watch it.


She’s starting to tolerate stuff on her head. Sometimes I can get her to wear a bow or a hat for a couple hours. She’ll even walk around the house with these things and ask me to put them on her head. Then she’ll take them back off and swing them in her hands while walking around.

Fun stuff
• Talking: Most of it is gibberish, but she talks all. the. time. She’s such a little chatterbox. She does have quite a few words though including bye-bye/say bye-bye/go bye-bye, hi, yay, yeah, this/is this, mmm, uh-oh, OK, toes, baby, leaf/leaves, uh-uh/no-no, ew, stairs, yum, eye, mouth, and I think that’s it.
• Ew: Speaking of the word ew, she says it so much and at mostly appropriate times, like stinky diaper changes or when she gets her hands into something gross. I really think it is cute.
• Singing: I never understand any of her songs, nor have I heard the melodies before, but she hums and sings her made up gibberish throughout the day.
• Animal Sounds: mooing like a cow, buzzing like a bee, barking like a dog, cawing like the crows at our apartment complex, and mewing like a cat. Most of the time when she wakes up from a nap or in the morning the first thing she does is bark and mew.
• New Foods: Ever since I pulled her off all the stuff she was allergic to, the food issues have been getting easier and easier. She is so much more willing to try new foods and actually even eats them. She often mooches off our plates at dinner now and is getting so much better at eating. At first it was quite the novelty for me to see her actually try and then like meat and some veggies. She does still have a few problems in this area, but we are getting better. One of the main problems is that sometimes she will just keep chewing and chewing a food and not swallow it. I’m not sure why. Usually when she doesn’t like something she will reach in her mouth, pull it out and hand it to you (mmm, yeah the joys of motherhood, right?) so I don’t think that is the issue. She’ll even say “mmm” as she’s chewing it. We just can’t get her to swallow. Sometimes I just wind up sticking my finger in there and pulling out the paste if it has been too long and she’s about to take a nap or something where I don’t want a wad of food stuck in her mouth.
• Copycat: She loves to try and do what we’re doing. The other night we were eating at a Mexican restaurant. She was watching very carefully while Stephen dipped his taquitos in some guacamole. Even though she didn’t have any guacamole she proceeded to copy the dipping motion with her little bites of food. I think this is where she also picked up on the word “OK,” as I tend to say it a lot. One night when she was saying it over and over a whole bunch Stephen said to her, “Good thing Mama just says OK a lot and not F-you,” to which she replied, “OK, OK, OK.” 
• Dancing: She loves music and tries to dance or bounce around especially if there is a particularly upbeat song on.
• Reading: Books are one of her favorite things. She loves to have us read to her, she loves pulling out her books and pointing to various pictures to ask us what stuff is, she also loves pretending to read to us. She even does it complete with voice inflections and giggling at key points. And if she recognizes an animal in the book she’ll start making its sound.  It is pretty cute.

• Mama’s Little Helper: While her help isn’t always so helpful, she really does like to help me do stuff around the house. Since I usually don’t have much of a timetable I think it is fun to encourage her in this even if sometimes I wind up with a little more mess or spending way more time than I would have on an activity. Her particular favorite is helping with the laundry. She loves to put in/pull out the clothes in the washing machine and dryer and put in/pull them out of the baskets. She tries to help when we fold diapers. At first she’ll start out by putting the different pieces in my various piles correctly, but it usually decends into her tossing wash cloths all over the room while I race to try and finish stuffing the diapers before she makes too much of a mess. She also loves to watch while I do dishes or make food. We’re just a little paranoid about the kitchen though so I don’t really let her help much in there. She usually watches from a safe distance in her walker or booster seat and I try to tell her about what I’m doing as I go along.

Not so fun stuff
• Hitting: About two days ago Bean started hitting me when she doesn’t get her way. It has only happened a handful of times. The first time I was letting her snack on some rice cake while I was knitting on the couch. She’s a stuffer though so I only give her a few bites at a time. Her mouth was completely full, but she wanted more rice cake. I told her, as usual, to finish chewing. She kept trying to grab at the bag and going “uuuuh… uuuuuh…. yeah.” When I said no and to finish chewing she scrunched her face up, hit me on the leg with all the force her little arm could muster (which isn’t much), and grunted. So that was the end of the rice cake and a tantrum of epic proportions ensued. Next time I was knitting and she kept trying to pull on my knitting needles/yarn/project. I told her no and she did the same thing. That time I put her in a timeout in the pack n’ play. Another tantrum ensued and I decided it was naptime.
• No: The word “no” is becoming one of her favorites. Sometimes if we ask her to come to us or do something she’ll shake her head and say, “no-no” over and over or run away.
• Grabbing: If something is purposely out of her reach or we have something she wants she has started trying to take matters into her own hands and grab it.
• Demanding: Also, if we have something she wants or it is out of her reach and we don’t get it for her upon first asking she’ll start trying to grab it and say, “yeah” or “aaah” or whinning very loudly. Sometimes she even starts crying.

Needless to say, with all these little issues popping up I’ve ordered The Dicipline Book from the Sears Parenting Library. Any other titles or recommendations are welcome. I know she’s only fifteen months old, but I don’t want to have these behaviors continue to get to nightmarish proportions by the times she’s say three and capable of a lot more.

Also, please don’t think that I’m completely worn out or overwhelmed by all this either. I’m really not having that hard of a time with it and she is mostly a really, really great kid. She has a fun spirit, she giggles a lot, and she is totally happy almost all the time. Anyone that has watched her or been around us always comments on how sweet and well behaved she is. These issues are really far and few between, but like I said I want to curb them now before they get out of hand.

1 Comment

Filed under Family, Parenting

Learning baby

I remember the first time I took Bean to one of my old workplaces and the head anchor there was like, “Lisa do you read to her?” “Um, not really,” I answered quite sheepishly. “Oh, I read to my boys all the time. I’d nurse them for hours and just read and read.”

I came home and was a little freaked out and intimidated. Oh, no! What if I was already stunting Bean’s development? I didn’t even have any kids books yet. I remember calling my sister-in-law and asking her if I should already be reading. A few weeks later Ruth brought up a mini-library for Bean and I started trying to read sometimes, but she honestly wasn’t at all interested.

Within the past year, Stephen has really started to love reading and learning. He is rarely without a book these days and his guitars and amps are mostly sitting around collecting dust. Part of that makes me a little sad as I’ve always been a big proponent of his musical endeavors, but it just isn’t where he’s at right now. I do love, however, the effect of both of us reading all the time has on Bean. Like most kids she wants to copy everything we do and being such a Papa’s girl this is especially true of anything he does. She loves to pull out her books when we do and look at the pictures, point to things in the book and ask us, “Isth ut?” (which I think might mean “What is that?” or “What is it?”) and have us read to her.

The past couple months I’ve also started going on starfall.com a couple times a week and doing a few letters with her until she gets bored. And then for her birthday, my sister, Andrea, gave us the Your Baby Can Read! language development system which has been featured on infomercials and TV shows. I admit to thinking this thing is quite cheesy, but I read through the materials and what he says about early learning seems to make sense.

I am not, however, willing to dedicate a daily allotment of time for reviewing the DVD, books and flash cards. I think his system is a bit strict for a child this young. Plus, I think the way the system goes about teaching words encourages sight-reading over phonics (which is why I continue to use starfall).

In the few weeks since we started using it though, Bean has learned some of the words. While she can’t say all of them, she does recognize clap (she claps her hands when it is said), mouth (will point to her mouth), baby (she can actually say this one), arms up (does this), and hi (waves).


Clapping after pointing to the word clap and hearing me say it.


Waving “hi” after I pointed to the girl waving hi and said hi to her.

I really don’t think there is much to his system though that most parents couldn’t cobble together on their own. I think the biggest part is just actually setting aside time to either read or go over words, pictures, letters, colors, etc. Repetition seems to be a big part of it too. I also think it is important to watch their cues when they are this young. If they are clearly disinterested and ready to move on to the next thing, I wouldn’t force them to continue to sit through the rest of the video or book or whatever.


She really likes pointing to the tiger and hearing me say that one. I’m not sure why.

Anyway, a few friends asked me to do a bit of a review of the product and that is what I think so far. I guess this means homeschooling has already begun around here?

3 Comments

Filed under Family, Homeschooling, Literary Love, Parenting, Reviews

Reading to Mama

Bean is so full of babble lately. She’s off in her own little world of conversation with or without you. I often find her sprawled out on the floor, book in front of her, babbling away and flipping through the pages. Or she’ll walk up and down the chair or couch where I happen to be saying “yeah” and other things I don’t quite understand. Her babbling is pretty constant. I really think it is fun and cute. Anyway, I caught her “reading” to me today on camera, enjoy!

6 Comments

Filed under Family, Parenting

Tension, tension, tension!

“All too frequently, your child’s reluctance to go to bed is actually a reflection of how her world is feeling at that moment. Sleep is very sensitive to our emotions. And while it is well documented that emotions can disrupt sleep for adults, what is not as well known is that they can also disturb the sleep of children–even infants. That’s because emotions ‘arouse’ the brain and body. As a result, our muscles tense, preparing us to take action.”

I just finished the section on tension triggers and it makes so, so much sense!

When did all this sleep/behavior trouble start? When Stephen and I decided that we were going to move among other things.

“It doesn’t have to be a traumatic event such as an accident or major illness to increase arousal and agitation for your cild. Getting lost in a store, being held down for a painful medical procedure, experiencing a bad storm, hearing a terrifying news story, or having a teacher or coach who yells and shames, can be enough to keep your child awake at night for days, even weeks… It can be difficult to know what will significantly upset a child. During the last six months, has your child or family experienced any painful or distressful event? The residue may be lingering in your child’s body, pushing her across the line into tense energy… Major changes can also pose a problem. A move, a new baby, a divorce are obvious creators of tension, but what may not be as obvious are the little changes that actually have a big impact on tension… which disrupts your entire family’s sense of order and predictability… Switching beds or bedrooms, going on a family vacation, the start or end of a school year, or even the shift to daylight savings time can impact your child.”

-Being held down for painful medical procedure? Check (shots)
-Moving… check
-Switching beds… check (we transitioned from the Pack N Play to her crib after the move)
-Switching bedrooms… check (we not only changed to a new bedroom in the move, but started having her sleep in her own room after the move)
-Family vacation… check (well a sort of one day only thing for my sisters graduation, but I noticed it had a huge impact)
-Daylight savings time… check.

“Anthropologist Mark Finn from the University of Missouri has been studying children living on a remote tropical island for more than thirteen years…What he discovered is that children’s (even infants’) stress levels peak when the key adults in their lives are stressed. What may seem inconsequential to adults–a fight between Mom and Dad, Grandma fretting about bills, or Mom leaving on a business trip–causes a child’s cortisol levels to rise… It appears that, without meaning to, you can communicate your stress to your child via your touch, voice tone, and gesture. When you slam the door, throw down the car keys, or yell, the force and tone convey to your child that something is amiss and that he needs to be on alert. Immediately, stress hormones are released into her body. Your stress also preoccupies you, making it less likely that you’ll pick up your child’s cues and respond patiently. The result is a child who feels more anxious and insecure and, as a result, fights to stay awake.”

I am horrible when it comes to masking and dealing with stress. I am sure I’ve transmitted how I’m feeling to Bean. I just tend to be a pretty emotional person in general. If I am worn out or stressed about the tiniest thing it is pretty obvious. Stephen is way better at this stuff, but then again not. He’ll say that he’s fine and not stressed, but I can tell. He does act different. He isn’t fine.

“Ironically, the less sleep your child has the more stress hormones his body releases to keep him going. If your child isn’t sleeping or behaving well, think back on the events of the week. Did you have to wake him from a nap? Did he skip a nap or stay up late for a special event? Did he spend a restless night in a hotel or at a slumber party? If these things occurred, you can assume that your child is experiencing high tension.”

When I run errands all day or the day is just really exciting because people are here and there is stuff going on, Bean often skips naps or doesn’t nap for very long. Consequently, she is sometimes harder to get to sleep and get her to stay asleep that night because she is so overtired and having a hard time shutting down.

“Lights, noise, crowds, and colors are all sensations that can stimulate the brain. Some children seem to easily block those sensations and drop off to sleep in the midst of them. Others get revved up and just can’t fall asleep. But high levels of stimulation are the norm for most families, and, as a result, it is easy to miss this as a cause… Do a life check. Did battery-operated toys arrive as gifts for your newborn? … Have you ever noticed that, after a day of shopping your child can’t sleep? Stop, look and listen. How many different sensations is your child’s brain trying to process at once? Does the stimulation level in your child’s life leave him cringing, too tight to sleep? If your child is especially sensitive to stimulation, it doesn’t mean that you should never go to an amusement park for fun, or a restaurant for dinner. It’s just a reminder that if his day has been filled with hours of television-watching, crowds of people, and a barrage of stimulation, it’s likely that he’ll need more help settling down for the night… Sometimes it’s the pace and sense of rushing that can be keeping your family awake. Even when you’ve been looking forward to the activities and thoroughly enjoy them, there’s a line where you and your child cross from calm into tense energy…  Often we become so accustomed to this level of tension that we are not even aware of it. Take special care to pay attention to the needs of a younger child who gets toted along… The stress of a too-busy life can get you and your child not only during the day, but at night as well. Recognizing this allows you to find the balance between a busy, yet satisfying day and one that leaves everyone in a frenzy.”

Bean is defnitely very easily stimulated by the world. When we are in public she deals with this by becoming quietly observant. However, she does start to dart her head around trying to take it all in. Sometimes even just Stephen’s presence is enough to send her over the edge of excitement and overstimulation. As I’m carrying her upstairs for a diaper change she’ll be in a frenzy to keep her eyes on him. If she hears his voice and he comes home during a nursing session I can just throw in the towel because there will be no use trying to keep her attention on the task at hand. Papa is just too exciting. This is one reason I am so glad we don’t have cable or the ability to watch TV right now. I think we would have even more problems.

“Pschologist Tom Anders found in his studies that children nine to fourteen months old wake more frequently than six-month-old infants. The reason, he believes, is the huge surge in physical devopment at this stage. It’s during this period of nine to fourteen months that most tiny toddlers begin to pull themselves up to standing, and begin walking. The joy of these new skills raises arousal levels and so enthralls the child that even in the middle of the night he wants to practice… So, if your child is waking in the night or battling to stay up, ask yourself, is she within six weeks of her birthday or half birthday when growth spurts tend to occur? Or have you noticed any significant change in her skills?… What skills is your child working on right now? What is he able to do that he couldn’t do six months ago? The quest to grow may be keeping him aroused.”

Yes, yes and yes. Stephen and I have come into Bean’s room in the middle of the night to find her trying to sit up, crawl, roll over and pull herself up onto the side of the crib. The other night she was saying “Ma ma ma” a bunch in her sleep. During the day her new discoveries are often a huge source of tension in her little body, especially when she can’t quite get to or do the thing that she wants.

So often though I’ve just been frustrated. I take her attitude personally as if she can somehow control it. Instead of seeing things through her perspective. This new exciting world to her. Each day it seems she discovers a new toy, finds a new way to do something.

“When you are able to tune into the ‘culprits’ that are creating tense energy in your child’s life, you won’t feel so out of control. As a result, you’ll respond more empathaetically, recognizing that your child is not trying to be difficult. Your awareness will also allow you to be kinder to yourself. You are not a bad or ineffective parent. It’s tension that is keepig your child on alert, unable to sleep and acting up. The ‘force’ is no longer invisible. It’s concrete and manageable, and you are now ready to take the steps to reduce it, so that everyone can sleep.”

3 Comments

Filed under Family, Literary Love, Parenting